Back to Breathing

Six weeks. It doesn’t even sound like much, does it? It’s long enough though. Long enough to change habits, long enough to weaken, long enough to grow tired. The family left a few days ago, after 6 weeks of their summer sailing holiday. We are exhausted. From what though? Sure, the sail-wash-polish-repeat pattern can wear on you, but we love sailing and I even love polishing, so it’s not the hard work and harsh sun that tires me. It’s simpler than that. It’s the humanness. It’s letting aside your hunger for theirs, your sleep for their rest, your sweat for their air-conditioning. Their comfort and well being comes above all else. It’s our job. So they eat first, shower first, sleep first. We are...

HITCH-HIKING IN THE AXIS OF EVIL - BOOK REALESED!

                                This is the cover of “Hitch-hiking in the Axis of Evil - By thumb through Iraq, Iran and Afghanistan”, my first book to be properly published and available internationally after ten years of self publishing. The book is consciously aimed at providing evidence of the hospitality I experienced while hitch-hiking across the Islamic World, during the first stage of my on going round the world hitch-hiking expedition. In those lands nicked “the Axis of Evil” by George Bush, where mass media only predicates terrorism and violence, I would stumble day by day upon the...

Photos: Melbourne to Sydney

Once again, I’ll let the photos tell their own stories! Enjoy! Sam at Crunchytown, in his usual attire. Yes he is FIXING that freewheel with boiling water =) Diamo Trails, the BMX park I was lucky enough to find my first night out from Melbs Second flood crossing that day – just strip off the shoes and roll up the pant legs classic Oz Lake Eildon on a nice day Lake Eildon again – its a big lake Just messing around on the shores of Lake Eildon A wombat, a real live wombat! Lake Eildon on a rainy day         Sitting the Bush Throne   Tallangatta area Tallangatta area   A misty morn in VIctoria A public village park – no one would dare challenge a poor soaking wet cyclist would they?...

Bush Biker’s Rewards

I got to Canberra early enough to make a detour to the Green Shed, a side business attached to the local rubbish dump. I appreciate that they save them from the landfill, but most of the bikes in there were crap. I found one wheel, though, whose rim might replace mine. I bought it for five bucks and strapped it down on top of the pile. Made it to Parliament House (with random bike cop) That night Nic helped me celebrate with a couple cold beers. This time it was much more than simply completing another leg of the bike tour. I won’t argue that doesn’t merit a couple beers too, of course, but I had really seen through something new that day, something I wasn’t sure I could even do. It was a proud night for me. I knew I would have to let...

Tale of a Bush Biker – Part Two

I’ve been right into Australian bushcraft since I first set foot on the cattle property out back in Queensland. There’s still a lively remnant of the old homesteaders and cattle ranchers out there, a tradition of making do with what you’ve got. I love the practicality of it, the improvised craftsmanship. It’s impressive, the sheer resourcefulness of old timers like Keith, who keeps his property running “on nothing but the smell of an oily rag.” One bushie trick in particular was floating around in my head as I lifted my gear over a barbed wire fence that evening. It’s a fencing join called the figure eight, really just a reef knot, assembled from two ends of wire and secured tighter the more the fence is “strained.” A figure eight in a...

Macpacking: Florence- Hitchhiking and Living in a Monastery (with a splash of Siena).

How can you ensure that you end up staying at the hostel you actually want to stay in? Well obviously you have to do some research, but everyone know that recommendations from fellow travelers are always more reliable! But what happens when you decide you want to change your hostel, prior to the date of arrival? That’s where you pay a small (€1-€2) cancelation fee on your Hostel Worlds booking- this has save Mackayla and I on more than one occasion. Once we had booked our very cheap accommodation for Florence we stumbled across a monastery turned hostel that was an hour of our the city and given the reviews we decided to stay there for the majority of our five days in Florence. The benefits of booking through Hostel World is that...

Philadelphia & Washington D.C. (video)

Here is the second video of the trip. From my departure of NYC to Philadelphia (by bus) then to Washington D.C. (hitchhiking) including the National Park of Shenandoah.  

South African White Girl Grows Up: PART 6 (2000)

23 February 2000 Wednesday Last night I dreamt that Jill woke me, saying she’d  found a note on the door for me from some friend of hers. It said: Advice: Day 1: wait;         Day 2: wait;  Day 3: wait;  Day 4: train   And another dream:  Ma and I were sitting in a new convertible that she’d bought on credit. She was complaining about it lacking something(always bitching). She grumbled, “They should’ve thrown in a Beetle”, implying “for you to drive”. Then she turned to me and said “Prostitutes make so much money, why do you keep doing it for free?” as if I‘ve been sleeping around! I got so angry I was literally growling and I could see she was afraid. I was pulling the thin-lipped angry-face I learnt from her. I called her a “stupid...

Day 158, 159, 160 and 161: Paris

If you had to pick a single cuisine for each meal of the day what would you choose. For example you would have to eat Moroccan food for dinner everyday, American for lunch and aztecan for breakfast. But let’s imagine in this scenario all the food is magically delivered to you so We don’t have to consider the accessibility or practically of different cuisines. So this is what I’m currently thinking. Breakfast: Australian cafe cuisine Morning snacks: Chinese Lunch: Italian Afternoon snacks: Malaysian Dinner: Thai Dessert: French Some things I’m still struggling over – I’m no so sure about my choice my for breakfast or afternoon snacks. The one thing I’m really sure of is dessert. As if you’d...

Orgelet

So two days just passed in which I was once again lost on big and smaller roads in France, carried along by well willing locals with their innate stories and perspectives, while I tried to shake off the worries and concerns of my little life in the Netherlands, meeting them all the more in their contrast with the nature and freedom I viewed from a very close distance. It’s remarkable how differently time passes by when one hops from spot to spot. Is it a mind-set thing? With only three hours on the road, how many sites have passed by today that would totally be worth further examination? Have fragments of myself perhaps remained behind, still hovering around to perceive the local beauty? Have pieces of my soul remained in...

my personal Bucket list

Everyone who travels should have a bucket list. that’s a list with goals, things you want to do,experience. That can be learning anything new (e.g. a language or an activity like surfing), doing some special activity (e.g. skydiving) or just some fun stuff you want to do (embracing a tree or whatever ). Such a list is important to get you going, it’s motivating and it always reminds you what you really want and prevents you from boredom and  getting stuck somewhere too long. my personal Bucket List (to be continued): - go surfing - get a diving license - go skydiving - climb a vulcano - sleep/camp outdoors - get a longboard and cruise around - meet new people by couchsurfing - hold a huge spider - hold a koala - visit Angkor...

Escape into life

July 10th 2014 – Bucharest, Romania 5 o’clock in the morning. I hear something in my dream. It’s kind of different. And it’s getting louder. Of course! It’s the alarm from my phone. Damn! “Just 3 hours of sleep, but still enough”, I’m thinking. The mirror in the bathroom says a different story. I’m a wreck! The backpack is ready. But am I ready? I have really no clue, but in just 20 minutes I’m in the subway station heading to the outskirts of Militari neighbourhood. Just a few minutes past 6 o’clock I’m sticking out my thumb on the right side of the road. Is this a good spot to start hitchhiking? Is there a PERFECT spot for that? I have no idea! Minutes pass by and...

Hitchhikers Guide to the USVI

Dearest Mickey, Hitchhiking here is a 100% valid way of traveling. Instead of sticking out a thumb, you stick out a finger. Up means that you have some cash you’re willing to give to the driver, and down means you’re just a rambler hoping to bum a ride. Almost everyone here picks up hitchers, in the day or night, and it’s safe. And let me tell you, gracious drivers stopping to pick me up have saved me more than a time or two. Casting off from Red Hook, St. Thomas, Allie

Hitchbot enters final leg of its Halifax-to-Victoria journey

KELOWNA, B.C. – The chatty, social-media-savvy robot that’s been thumbing rides with Canadians over the past three weeks is nearing the end of its Halifax-to-Victoria hitchhiking adventure. Its creators say the last time it checked in early Wednesday morning Hitchbot was passing through Kelowna, B.C., on its way to the Open Space art centre on Vancouver Island. “We were expecting the unexpected,” said the robot’s co-creator David Smith, who teaches in the department of communication studies at McMaster University in Hamilton. “But there’s no way that we could have expected the number of really memorable and significant events that Hitchbot participated in.” READ MORE: HitchBOT robot ready to...

The Hitchhiker's Guide to Time Travel: Southeastern Armenia

A shared taxi from Tbilisi took us across the border into Armenia, through the stunning Debed Canyon and down the highway into the capitol, Yerevan.  We spent a night there before hopping into yet another shared taxi to Armenia’s southeastern corner, Syunik Province.  On the way, we passed the legendary Mount Ararat (hard to see in the haze), fertile valleys, traditional bakery, and stunning mountainous scenery.   Disembarking at the turnoff for Tatev, it was like taking a giant step back in time.  We caught a ride in a passing car, which of course resulted in us ending up in the house of one of the other passengers for coffee and candy, before heading through the twisting, treacherous road to Tatev.       Armenia has an...

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